How to Deal with Strangers Touching Your Baby in China

Most parents, whether they live in China or not, know the frustrations of having to deal with strangers wanting to touch their newborn. Living in China means facing these experiences, on a far greater scale, and in ways that will surely blow your mind. We have had complete strangers pick up our child, and walk away! Many lean in close to look at our son, and then touch his face. To be honest, this infuriated me in the beginning. Trusting that a complete stranger has clean hands, in any country, is a risky game. As your child gets older and their immune system has strengthened a little, these intrusive touches may begin to bother you less, but still many parents are highly aggravated by these actions. By the time that your little one can walk, they will be bombarded by one group after the next, all wanting a photo with this sweet foreign face. Here

Posted in

Teaching Kids to Embrace Cultural Diversity

As a couple who have become parents in an exclusively foreign environment, this has been a wonderful chance for us to introduce our child to racial and cultural diversity. We are blessed to be able to raise our son abroad, but since we are from different countries, no matter where we live, at least one of us will always be a foreigner. In our community, and while out and about traveling the world, we come across so many ethnicities. This gives our son plenty of wonderful opportunities to learn and appreciate how different cultures live. Understanding that people are not all the same will enable your children to embrace and value the things that make each person or group of people different. Children really do notice differences, so take the time to teach what is important to each culture and help strengthen acceptance and understanding. Even though we are currently

Posted in

Battery Sizes in China

…and how to ask for Vodka, too The other day I went to the hardware store to get some batteries. I knew some of the battery names, but one that I didn’t know was how to say “9-volt battery”. So, I went in hoping that I would be able to communicate with the shop owners what kind of battery I was looking for. After a few attempts back and forth he finally brought out the one I was looking for and said, “jiǔ fútè” (九伏特), teaching me how to say the word “nine volt”. Immediately, I heard the similarity of the Chinese word for volt to the English equivalent, and I said, “vole-tuh”, trying to emphasize the sound to make it sound like the Chinese word. The shop owner said, “bu bu bu, fútè“. I laughed and tried to explain that the word must’ve come as an English transliteration. But

Posted in

What to Do if You’re Bitten by a Dog in China

So, in my last post I told the story about how I was surrounded by an angry pack of dogs and ultimately bitten twice by a German Shepherd. If you haven’t read about that experience yet, be sure to click here. After I was bitten by the dog – and the initial shock of the situation – we found our way to a friend’s house and told them about what happened. The dog hadn’t done terrible damage to my leg. However, he did break the skin and my pant leg in the area around my knee and hip. This, of course, meant that I would have to get the dreaded rabies shot. If an animal breaks the skin when biting you, his saliva, which may contain the rabies virus, also gets in your blood stream. Basically, if he’s got rabies – so, now, do you. Now, my whole life, all

Posted in

The Time I Saved my Wife and Unborn Child’s Lives

…Or why I’m (irrationally) afraid of dogs Today, as I was bringing the trash outside, I had a moment where I audibly gasped as fear rippled through my body. I’m not exactly a fearful person, but the sight of an unexpected, large dog only 15 feet away from me and headed my direction will cause it every time. Truth is, I’m undeniably and irrationally afraid of dogs. In fact, one time I was literally standing on a 40 degree roof of a house and was seized with fear because I thought I heard a dog coming at me! I guess that’s the problem with irrational fear – it’s not rational. I haven’t always been afraid of dogs. Growing up I liked dogs. At my friends’ houses I wasn’t afraid to pet their dogs. And I certainly didn’t seize up with fear if I saw one. But we never had a

Posted in

How to Find the Right Gynecologist When You Are in China

Woman’s body is a very fragile and a complex system. A woman needs to spend a lot of time for our regular checks and consultations to keep a check on our system and remain healthy. Choosing gynecologist can be slightly stressful for a woman as she needs to be prepared to share some intimate information with the doctor if necessary. On the whole, a gynecologist may play a significant role in a woman’s health. China is a country which relies on a lot on their traditional Chinese medicine along with the use of advanced technologies.   Gynecology in China – China is one of the most developed countries in terms of technology, but they give a lot of importance to their traditional methods of treatment. Chinese medicine handles the gynecology as complicated procedure in which they try to take a deep insight into the problem. Apart from directly treating a

Posted in

Five Things You Should Know About Living in China

I still remember the time I realized that moving to China might actually be a possibility. I was excited, scared, and really had no idea what to expect. Being considered a “third world country”, I didn’t know how to prepare. I didn’t even know what language to study! Should I study Mandarin, Cantonese or something else entirely? To be sure, China is strikingly different from life in the West. If the possibility of moving to China is looming on your mind, it is not uncommon to think and rethink the idea before breaking the news to the family. It’s only natural to be worried about moving half way around the world. But, let’s not let our worries hinder such an opportunity to embrace new culture and truly understand and experience diversity. Let’s take a look at some of the important changes you will experience as an Expat. Social Media. What

Posted in

Moving to China? Here is All You Need to Know

If you are moving to China for work, the first step you should take is research. Do away with old-fashion images of workers in paddy fields. China is especially diverse. In addition to the English-speaking Chinese population, you can expect expats from around the world representing their company’s interest in China. Living in China If you are moving to China with your children, the move will definitely be daunting. Raising children in a completely different culture will require adjustments. Spend time before the move learning the language. Allow older children to help in the decision making process about school and/or house. Once you arrive in China, travel around with your family and get comfortable with your surroundings. These tiny steps will make the adjustment process easier. If you are pregnant or planning to get pregnant, you do not have to turn down this job opportunity. There are many Chinese hospitals

Posted in

Pregnant in China: Some Helpful Tips

For expats living in China, being pregnant can bring up a whole range of anxieties and issues that they might not even fret about in their home countries. Such anxieties come with living in a country with strong traditions, unfamiliarity with local language and customs, and lacking a support system. However, if expectant parents do a bit of planning and organizing, then having a baby in China can be an enjoyable experience. Prenatal planning You can take up the following simple steps to ensure a healthy pregnancy and delivery in China. If you are having a baby in China, the first step to take is to consult a doctor. For this, you have many options in the country. One option is to go to a hospital that has a doctor trained in China. He or she will most likely adhere to the local pregnancy treatments and delivery systems to the

Posted in

Cost of Raising a Child in China

The Chinese economy has  been flourishing at a rapid  rate. However along with the steady economic progress, the cost of living in China has also been growing over the years. The higher cost of living in China is such a stark reality for its citizens that when in 2013 the Chinese government eased up on ‘one child policy’, it raised concerns among the people.   If the cost of raising children in China is a matter of anxiety for its citizens, how does it affect the expatriate community in China? The concerns Bringing up kids is not an easy thing to do, even when parents do not have any financial or personal problems. There are a million things that could go wrong or there is always a nagging feeling at the back of parents’ mind if they are doing all they can for their children. This is a part of

Posted in