Routine Checkups

Complete blood count (Hematocrit, Hemoglobin, White Blood Cell Count)

Completed at initial visit, 28, 36 weeks

This test is completed to survey the general health and well-being of mothers. This gives a baseline that can also be used during pregnancy to assess the mother.

Type and Rh

Completed at initial visit

This test is completed to determine mother’s blood type; if mother is Rh negative she will receive a Rhogam injection at 27 weeks, and possibly after delivery if fetus is Rh positive.

Antibody Screen

Completed at initial visit, 36 weeks

Rubella

Completed at initial visit

This test is completed to assess if the mother will need an injection for Rubella immunity after pregnancy.

50 Gram 1 Hour Glucose Challenge Test

24 to 28 weeks

This test is completed to indicate possible gestational diabetes.

HBsAg

Completed at initial visit, as indicated

These are completed to indicate high risk maternal-fetal transmission that can be reduced by prophylactic administration with medications.

Urinalysis

Completed at initial visit

This test is completed to survey the general health and well-being of mothers. This gives a baseline that can also be used during pregnancy to assess the mother.

Urine cultural and sensitivity

Completed at initial visit

This test is completed to survey the general health and well-being of mothers. This gives a baseline that can also be used during pregnancy to assess the mother.

Glucose/protein

Completed at each visit

These are completed to detect protein or glucose in the urine to treat early onset of complications such as Gestational Hypertension or Gestational Diabetes

Pap smear

Completed at initial visit

This test is completed to survey the general health and well-being of mothers. This can also detect any possible complication that may arise during the pregnancy or labor.

Group B Strep culture

Completed at 36 weeks

This is a culture completed to find the status for GBS in the mother. If she is positive she will require treatment with antibiotics during labor to decrease transmission to the fetus.

GC/Chlamydia probe

Completed at initial visit, 36 weeks

These are completed to indicate high risk maternal-fetal transmission that can be reduced by prophylactic administration with medications.

Rh Antibody

Completed at initial visit, 28weeks

This test is completed to determine mother’s blood type, if mother is Rh negative she will receive a rhogam injection at 27 weeks, and possible after delivery in fetus is Rh positive

HIV

Completed at initial visit, 36 weeks

This can be completed to indicate high risk maternal-fetal transmission of HIV that can be reduced by prophylactic administration of antiretroviral medications before and during pregnancy

Maternal serum screening (double, triple, quadruple screen)

Completed at 15 to 20 weeks

This test is completed to assess mothers that are high risk for possible genetics complications.

Sickle cell screen

Completed at initial visit

This test is completed to indicate high risk patients for Sickle Cell traits.

Tay-Sachs screen

Completed at initial visit

This test is completed to indicate high risk patients for Tay-Sachs.

PPD (tuberculin screen)

Completed at initial visit

This test is completed to indicate high risk patients for Tuberculosis.

Reference:
Simpson, Kathleen Rice: Creehan, Patricia A. (2008). Perinatal Nursing. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

4 comments on “Routine Checkups
  1. Numbers says:

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  2. Janina says:

    I know the comment is rather old, but I want to leave my reply for future reference anyways: I am going to the Shanghai East Hospital, VIP section (NOT the Shanghai East International thingy) and there the Rh test was done with the first appointment’s big blood test and the Doctor immediately informed me about the possible risks and what we would need to do. She only got “calm” when I told her my husband was Rh negative as well (so the baby will be Rh negative for sure, so no incompatibility issues – just hope they have enough 0 negative blood on stock in case I might need it, as I am o negative…).

    Anyways, also keep in mind what the doctor told me: As this is so rare in china, the hospital would have needed to order the Rhogam shot several weeks in advance for me. The hospital does not have it on stock but purchases it only when needed. So try not to take care of this last minute…

  3. Sarah says:

    I have been to the doctors three times since I found out I was pregnant, I live in Shanghai. None of these tests were done, neither were any of the doctors really ‘interested’. I informed them that I might be Rh negative they kept assuring me that it was my first child so it didn’t matter. I don’t know if it is communication breakdown and a cultural gap, but I’m feeling the urge to go home. I can’t afford the international hospitals. Should I be worried.

    • Jeremy says:

      Hey, Sarah. We had a similar problem with our first. In our case, we knew that my wife was Rh(-). Even though we were at a premier hospital by local standards (Peking Union Medical Hospital), they seemingly knew very little about the issues of being Rh negative and the need for the Rhogam injection. In the end, we missed the first injection and finally convinced the doctor to help us find a place to buy it only after the birth of our child.

      This likely for two reasons, 1.) There are few Chinese people with Rh(-) blood types. According to this site, http://www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0877658.html, only 1% of people have Rh(-) blood type. 2.) And the fact that most Chinese (are allowed to) have only one child.

      If, in fact, you are Rh(-) and the father is Rh(+) you should received two Rhogam injections. The first at 28 weeks and the second within 18 hours after birth.

      While it is true that the Rh incompatibility will not be a problem for your first child, getting the Rhogam shots are really for your future children. Basically, if your baby is Rh(+) and his/her blood mixes with yours, your body will build up a “suspicion” toward that type of cell so that it could possibly attack it if it were to see it again (e.g. in your future children). Here’s a great article describing it a little bit better: http://www.whattoexpect.com/pregnancy/ask-heidi/rhogam-and-rh-negative.aspx

      Here’s what I would do if I were you:
      1. Find out for sure if you’re Rh(-) or not. If you’re Rh(+), then you’ve got not worries. (You might have to go to the foreigner hospital for this test as Chinese hospitals might not know how to check for this.)
      2. If you are in fact Rh(-), find out if the father is Rh(+).
      3. If both are true – you are Rh(-) and the father is Rh(+) – then you need to get a hold of the Rhogam injection.

      Getting the Rhogam shot is not easy, however. Likely, the foreign hospitals will not sell it to you. They will only administer it if you are a patient of theirs. On our forums, someone mentioned a way to purchase it online. Unfortunately, it is only in Chinese, so you will need help with understanding the page and then purchasing it. You’ll also need to convince your doctor at the local hospital to administer it. Here’s the link to our forum page concerning it: http://www.havingababyinchina.com/forum/general-inquiries-on-having-a-baby-in-china/rhogam-shot-for-rh-negative/

      Please keep us updated and let us know if you have more questions.

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In the Media
We were interviewed by a reporter at radio86.com. The reporter featured HBIC in a two-part series.
Part 1 talks about our personal experiences in having babies in China. (2011.4.19)

Part 2 focuses on "Curious Traditions". (2011.6.01)

2009.8 - Check out this article which featured our family and our website! Qingdao Expat Magazine